Jun 032013
 

Rehabbing major leaguer Jayson Werth clubbed two three-run home runs to lead Potomac to its fifth straight win, 10-6, and complete the sweep of divisional rival Lynchburg.

The six runs driven in, however, masked another poor showing from A.J. Cole, who got the win despite allowing runs in each of the first three innings and four overall. The 21-year-old gave up four runs total on six hits, including a pair of home runs.

To his credit, he walked none and struck out eight. The problem is that when the Hillcats connected, there was little in-between — a loud out or a long drive, as just three of the 17 outs he recorded came on the ground.

Offensively, the Potomac lineup continues to improve as they continue to show patience (eight walks) while still delivering hits when they’re needed (5-for-12 with RISP). Like Friday night, the first inning was emblematic of this balance.

Billy Burns and Werth both drew walks while Michael Taylor singled to load the bases. Jason Martinson refused to take the bait of a steady diet of breaking pitches (the word is out) and drove in the first run with the inning’s third walk. Kevin Keyes followed with a two-run single to left to push the early lead to 3-0.

Patience would also play a part in both the Werth home runs. Francisco Soriano and Burns both walked with two outs in the 4th to set up the first big fly, a shot over the Budweiser sign in right-center (pictured). In the 8th, Soriano walked again and Billy Burns beat out an infield hit, then the two bookends trotted home ahead of Werth’s second shot, a first-pitch fastball deposited just short of the scoreboard in left field, turning a 7-6 lead into the 10-6 final outcome.

Potomac heads to Southern Division-leading Myrtle Beach for the next four games before returning for their final home series of the first half, a weekend set against the current second-place Frederick Keys.

Jul 032011
 

A 14-1 beatdown isn’t very common for the P-Nats. Being on the winning side of it is almost unusual. Throw in a decent rehab start, a few home runs, and you’ve got one of the more memorable evenings in a long time.

In front of an estimated reported crowd of 6,911, the Potomac Nationals gave the crowd a rousing victory and fireworks show before they even lit a match. Destin Hood, Francisco Soriano, and Brian Peacock all went deep, with Hood connecting for a two-run shot to right-center and three-run bomb to left as part of an 18-hit onslaught.

Every batter reached base, and every batter got a hit, with the homer-run hitters each going 3-for-5 and five batters getting multiple hits. Potomac did the bulk of its damage in the eighth, scoring seven runs on seven hits, with Peacock driving in all three of his runs on a home run (pictured above) and a two-out, two-run triple.

I suppose I’ve buried it as deep as I can, but Chien-Ming Wang pitched fairly well, albeit against a substandard lineup (the best hitter having a .259 GPA, league average is .236) going four scoreless innings and allowing one hit and two walks while striking out two.

Unlike most rehabbing pitchers, Wang used more than just his fastball and sinker, mixing in changeups and sliders. Early in the contest, he was hitting in the low-to-mid-80s but by the end of his outing he was in the upper 80s and low-90s. Wang allowed just one flyball to the outfield and got six of the twelve outs on groundballs, which is going to be key since it’s doubtful that he’ll ever return to throwing mid-90s heat*.

*As good a time as any to remind folks that I’m not a scout, I just play one on the web.

Mitchell Clegg and Neil Holland followed Wang on the mound, with Clegg getting knocked for four hits and a run in two innings and Holland working out of a bases-loaded-jam unscathed for two scoreless innings and properly getting credit for the win as the most effective reliever. Rob Wort Josjh Smoker pitched the ninth and got three outs with one walk.

The win brings Potomac back to .500 at 5-5 for the second half, but still one game back of first-half champ Frederick. Staff ace Danny Rosenbaum (4-3, 2.57) toes the slab for the P-Nats, opposed by the #14 Kansas City prospect (according to Basball America), 21-year-old Tim Melville (7-6, 4.23).